Death of a King

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The Passing of Théoden

Death of Théoden

(CR-ROTK Disc Three - Track 10)


 


Music by Howard Shore

Translated into Old English (Rohirric) by David Salo

Old English (Rohirric) Pronunciation Guide

English Text by J.R.R. Tolkien

ROTK, Book 5, Ch 6, The Battle of the Pelennor Fields

ROTK, Book 6, Ch 6, Many Partings


The English poem and the Old English translation are from the AS-ROTK.

Sung by The London Voices


Old English (Rohirric)

Original Tolkien poem


Of dreccunga, of dimnesse tó dæges úpgange Out of doubt, out of dark, to the days rising
Hé singende rád in sunnan, sweord bregdende He rode singing in the sun, sword unsheathing.
hyht eft onaelede and in hyhte geendode Hope he rekindled, and in hope ended;
Ofer endunga, ofer ege, ofer orlæge úp áhafen Over death, over dread, over doom lifted
Of lyre, of lífe, tó langum wuldre. Out of loss, out of life, unto long glory.

 

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ROTK, Book 5, Ch 6, The Battle of the Pelennor Fields:

In the book, Éomer has just found Théoden and Éowyn both fallen to battle (and believes both to be dead). And then, they see the black sails of the Corsairs and believe reinforcements have arrived for Sauron's army.

Stern now was Éomer's mood, and his mind clear again. He let blow the horns to rally all men to his banner that could come thither; for he thought to make a great shield-wall at the last, and stand, and fight there on foot till all fell, and do deeds of song on the fields of Pelennor, though no man should be left in the West to remember the last King of the Mark. So he rode to a green hillock and there set his banner, and the White Horse ran rippling in the wind.

Out of doubt, out of dark to the day's rising
I came singing in the sun, sword unsheathing.

To hope's end I rode and to heart's breaking:
Now for wrath, now for ruin and a red nightfall!

These staves he spoke, yet he laughed as he said them. For once more lust of battle was on him; and he was still unscathed, and he was young, and he was king: the lord of a fell people. And lo! even as he laughed at despair he looked out again on the black ships, and he lifted up his sword to defy them.

In the  movie, Théoden spoke the last line of those staves as he rallied the Rohirrim before the battle..

 

ROTK, Book 6, Ch 6, Many Partings

Some of the Théoden's words were repeated upon his burial in Rohan.

Then the Riders of the King's House upon white horses rode round about the barrow and sang together a song of Théoden Thengel's son that Gléowine his minstrel made, and he made no other song after. The slow voices of the Riders stirred the hearts even of those who did not know the speech of that people; but the words of the song brought a light to the eyes of the folk of the Mark as they heard again afar the thunder of the hooves of the North and the voice of Eorl crying above the battle upon the Field of Celebrant; and the tale of the kings rolled on, and the horn of Helm was loud in the mountains, until the Darkness came and King Théoden arose and rode through the Shadow to the fire, and died in splendour, even as the Sun, returning beyond hope, gleamed upon Mindolluin in the morning.

Out of doubt, out of dark, to the day's rising
he rode singing in the sun, sword unsheathing.
Hope he rekindled, and in hope ended;
over death, over dread, over doom lifted
out of loss, out of life, unto long glory.